daily painting titled Bag of olives

Bag of olives

18cm x 12cm (7"x4¾"), oil on board Painting status: SOLD
Daily painting for Friday 7 December, 2012
Posted in Still life paintings · 19 Comments
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19 Comments

I LOVE the bag and the shelf, all of it! Wonderful!

Many of your paintings look like they have been done by the Impressionists; this would never have been their subject, though!

The contrast between this painting and the 2010 one is fascinating--the first against a dark background, this one against a pale background. It gives the same subject a new challenge and a new look.
I very much enjoy receiving the daily e-mail. Thank you, Julian.

Hi Julian,
Wow Fantastic!!!
Look good enough to eat!
The color of the olives is excellent!
Tish..

Remarkable! You've made a plastic bag of olives look both mysterious and delicious!

Julian i love your work, but when I look at olives in a plastic bag, I feel suffocated. It's wonder ful that you can do this and make it realistic, but to me It just doesn't have any beauty!
Pat

A lovely limited palette in this, with many interesting varients and some deliciously subtle contrasts.

You mustn't forget Mary Anne that the Impressionists often painted very 'modern' subjects; the viaduct for example that Cezanne painted frequently, would have been brand new and 'hi-tech'; the equivalent would be painting the high speed trains and concrete bridges (which I'm sure Monet would have done)!

You shouldn't put yourself in the place of the olives Pat!

I've been looking at (and admiring) the work of Christopher Gallego, he said somewhere, and I'm heavily paraphrasing, that it is up to the artist to lift the subject out of the mundane through observation and sheer painting… perhaps I didn't quite do that for you.

Hi Julian,i have only recently been introduced to your postcards from Provence blog and am loving receiving the daily E-mail,todays bag of Olives are yummy,what a great ability you have !
It is obvious that you inspire an enormous number of people like myself,who aspire to being able to create such wonderful images ourselves,thanks Julian.(:-))

I also imagine this same bag but full of lemons or clementines quinces or persimmons....

Julian - brilliant! (again - don't you get tired of hearing that all the time?) What I find amazing is the bag itself -- such luminous transparency. How on earth do you do it? Thanks so much too for the link to Christopher Gallego's work. You both offer tremendous pleasure and beauty in a world that too often seems to lack both.

A plastic bag is made an object of beauty and mystery, an example of the way art transforms and makes us 'see'.

I much prefer this version over the 2010 version. It's much more Impressionistic (to my eye, at least), and actually kind of looks like it's slumped glass, especially in the way you've got the light hitting it.

Very interesting!!

Later,

Lynn

How on earth do you do it Julien? today I have tried and failed miserably to recreate your wonderfully executed impression of a plastic bag containing fruit, however, tomorrow I will succeed, no matter how many attempts.

Sorry - poor typing - 'Julian'

How on earth do you do it Julian? today I have tried and failed miserably to recreate your wonderfully executed impression of a plastic bag containing fruit, however, tomorrow I will succeed, no matter how many attempts. - sorry for spelling your name wrongly in the previous one.

Dear Julian,
of course there is much beauty to be savoured in a mundane plastic bag full of olives.
P.S. Thanks for mentioning Gallego, just swooned over a bag of plaster!!

Julian, I just meant there were no plastic bags in the days of the original Impressionists! Not that they wouldn't have painted it if it existed. As always, I love your work!